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About GPC

Mission

  • To facilitate the development of plant science for global challenges.

  • To foster international collaborations and enable the effective use of knowledge and resources.

  • To provide an independent and inclusive forum to bring together all those involved in plant and crop research, education and training.

Core Values

  • To be an organization that is based in plant and crop science.

  • To facilitate collaboration across geographic and scientific borders.

  • Inclusion and equity.

  • To speak with a single, strong voice for all those working in plant, crop, agricultural and environmental science across the globe.

Vision 2015–2018

  • To act as a “catalyst” within the global plant science community, and between scientists and other influencers, to promote collaborations and increase awareness of the key role plant science plays in all of our lives.

  • To provide a knowledgeable, curated source of relevant and useful plant science information on a global basis.

  • To facilitate science-based initiatives that will help close the gap between basic research and applied innovations.

  • To deliver increased value to the GPC member organizations and affiliates.

Priorities

To help identify and coordinate strategic solutions to global challenges, GPC is focusing on the following priority areas:

Initiatives

Within these areas the Global Plant Council focuses on specific initiatives to identify key challenges, evaluate ongoing research programs, identify gaps, prevent duplication of efforts and funding, and facilitate urgently required global strategic programs.

News

Scientists compare soil microbes in no-till, conventional tilling systems of Pacific Northwest farms

In recent decades, growers have increasingly been adopting no-till farming to reduce soil erosion and decrease fuel, labor, and inputs.


Into the wild for plant genetics

In a paper published in Scientific Reports, researchers at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, detail for the first time the opportunities for plant sciences that are now available with portable, real-time DNA sequencing.


Ray of hope for more abundant wheat crops

Crops such as wheat could be up to 21% more efficient at turning the sun's energy into food, according to new research by Lancaster University.