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About GPC

Mission

  • To facilitate the development of plant science for global challenges.

  • To foster international collaborations and enable the effective use of knowledge and resources.

  • To provide an independent and inclusive forum to bring together all those involved in plant and crop research, education and training.

Core Values

  • To be an organization that is based in plant and crop science.

  • To facilitate collaboration across geographic and scientific borders.

  • Inclusion and equity.

  • To speak with a single, strong voice for all those working in plant, crop, agricultural and environmental science across the globe.

Vision 2015–2018

  • To act as a “catalyst” within the global plant science community, and between scientists and other influencers, to promote collaborations and increase awareness of the key role plant science plays in all of our lives.

  • To provide a knowledgeable, curated source of relevant and useful plant science information on a global basis.

  • To facilitate science-based initiatives that will help close the gap between basic research and applied innovations.

  • To deliver increased value to the GPC member organizations and affiliates.

Priorities

To help identify and coordinate strategic solutions to global challenges, GPC is focusing on the following priority areas:

Initiatives

Within these areas the Global Plant Council focuses on specific initiatives to identify key challenges, evaluate ongoing research programs, identify gaps, prevent duplication of efforts and funding, and facilitate urgently required global strategic programs.

News

Newly-published spinach genome will make more than Popeye stronger

While you may not gulp spinach by the can-fuls, if you love spanakopita or your go-to appetizer is spinach artichoke dip, then you'll be excited to know that new research out of Boyce Thompson Institute (BTI) will make it even easier to improve this nutritious and delicious, leafy green.


‘Agricultural revolution’ in Anglo-Saxon England sheds new light on medieval land use

Researchers from the University of Leicester (UK) will be shedding new light on how an ‘agricultural revolution’ in Anglo-Saxon England fuelled the growth of towns and markets as part of a new project investigating medieval farming habits. The project, titled ‘Feeding Anglo-Saxon England (FeedSax): The Bioarchaeology of an Agricultural Revolution’, which is funded by the European Research Council, is led by the University of Oxford working with colleagues from the University of Leicester.


Micro delivery service for fertilizers

Plants can absorb nutrients through their leaves as well as their roots. However, foliar fertilization over an extended period is difficult. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, German researchers have now introduced an efficient delivery system for micronutrients based on biohybrid microgels. Special peptides anchor the "microcontainers" onto the leaf surface while binding sites inside ensure gradual release of the "cargo".